Personal Finance Daily: Everything you need to know about 401(k) fees and how to survive an IRS audit

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The weekend’s here, MarketWatchers. While you unwind from the work week, check out these top stories:

Personal Finance
What consumers need to know before going to a fertility clinic

It can cost $15,000 to freeze eggs, but the process comes with risks.

Everything you need to know about 401(k) fees

Most people don’t know they have fees lurking in their retirement accounts, or how many.

How to cut your cancer risk and save money at the same time

California passes a controversial new law.

Have kids? 5 ways the new tax law affects you

529 savings plans have changed, and so have income limits for the child tax credit.

This man canceled Amazon Prime and cut his online shopping habit in half

Does having an Amazon Prime account encourage you to buy more stuff?

Take this seat on an airplane to reduce your chances of getting sick

Germs spread in unexpected ways during long-distance flights.

My fiancé is 14 years older and has three kids — will we share his estate if he dies?

This 34-year-old woman is worried about her financial future if she marries (and he predeceases her).

A kosher-for-Passover wine with a basketball pedigree

Former NBA star Amar’e Stoudemire has gone into the vino business.

How to survive an IRS audit

Just because IRS audits are at a 15-year low doesn’t mean it can’t happen to you.

Elsewhere on MarketWatch
NRA finances still shaky despite post-Parkland surge

If the National Rifle Association were a public company, listed on a major stock exchange, the seemingly insecure financial state of its membership arm might be a reason to worry for its future.

Cash-out mortgage refis are back. Will homes become ATMs again?

As interest rates rise, fewer households refinance their mortgages. And the refinances that do get done are often very different than those initiated during low-rate periods.

Look out below as stock market bulls turn bearish

The U.S. economy will inevitably slow in the months ahead, hurting corporate earnings and, in turn, equity prices.

The sneaky reason the IRS might help stocks do well ahead of Tax Day

The Dow typically posts strong results in the first half of April, writes Mark Hulbert.